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Tres Beau Designs

Maniera Magazine Article
Published May 2010

Kimmera Madison came to the beta version of Second Life® with a friend on May 15, 2003 and became one of Second Life®’s earliest residents.   Madison was a content creator at the time, doing various freelance work in both graphic art and content creation for Blizzard and EA Games.  She also created content for Activeworlds.com and There.com.  So it is hardly surprising that she found an immediate fascination for design work in Second Life®.  Given her background, it is easy to see why her beautiful fashion designs are often pushing both the technical and artistic boundaries of Second Life®.

Originally, Madison found the Linden supplied clothing “rather boring”  and noted that “there weren’t many clothes designers back then, but those that were there, were awesome.”   But, she also quickly points out that she “had her own ideas, so I just made them.”

“Back then we did a lot of dance clubs, there wasn’t a whole lot else,” Madison said, laughing. “I’d wear something I made and get asked where they could buy it. So, I started with a single vendor, with 5 outfits outside a friend’s club on a 512 parcel.  I then ‘expanded’, got my own free 512 and set up a gazebo that became the first Tres Beau “shop”.   That was in 2004, and I now own two sims.”

Madison also owns two other clothing stores well worth the visit.   M’Ladys offers very elegant and often formal Victorian clothing created under the name of Teaa Demina.  A Copper Fer Yer Fancy is a medieval shop which has lots of fun and sometimes naughty items created under the name of Gimme Tapioca.

Madison uses Photoshop, Maya and Zbrush to create her designs.  Her creations run through a variety of fashions from beautiful gowns to elegant casual to just fun to wear clothes.  Madison’s talent is in creating clothes that “just feel so right” they flow around the body, complimented by colors and patterns that blend seamlessly into a flawless fashion statement.

“Designing for me is sort of like…an obsession,” Madison said. “I am always getting ideas, my external hard drive is overflowing with textures and inspirational pictures, I’m bad.  I never know when the idea will strike.  I have a dress named White Linen …that came to me in a dream.   I do the Victorian designs because it sates my need for overly abundant fluff.”

Madison is reputedly the first to design a wedding gown in Second Life® and the gowns she currently has available are to die for.  Fortunately, you can just buy one without having to go through the pain of a virtual death to get it.

Madison has been a major player in the fashion industry, almost since its inception.  She watched Second Life® fashions evolve and was party to many of those things that made huge impacts in the clothing we wear today.

“Back in the day, we rarely wore attachments, everything was on system layers.  So, figuring out we could attach multiple prims to bodies to using flexis to exploring sculpties to the ingenuity of some amazing visual souls in here, just blows my mind.”  Madison also notes the irony in that  “when flex attributes came out, the days of static skirts were GONE. Now we have sculpts, and they don’t move so we have sort of gone full circle.”

And looking into the future?  Madison believes the up-coming 3-D mesh technology will provide the next big advancements in fashion design, especially if they institute collision control and allow for flexi attributes.  Right now there is a lot of chatter in the blogs about mesh development, and it is in the stages of deciding how it will be used in-world.

In all, visiting Madison’s fashion sim is a wonderful experience.  There are so many things to choose from; things that are both elegant and different from many of the other designers in Second Life® today.  Tres Beau is a highly recommended experience and well worth the visit.

This entry was posted in Maniera Inc., Maniera Institute of Style, My Maniera Designer Feature, My Maniera Lifestyle and tagged , , , .
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